June 2019 edition of the TCCN Newsletter launched

(Download the newsletter here)

While 5G is a reality and has already been commercially launched in several parts of the world, there exist already numerous efforts and initiatives from industry and academia to look beyond 5G and conceptualize 6G by describing its roadmap along with the emerging trends and requirements, as well as several enabling techniques and architectures. Future wireless systems should effectively support a universal and ubiquitous cyber physical structure, new spectrum access schemes, and new forms of communications, while taking into account the energy efficiency and security/privacy considerations.

Two promising technologies for enabling the 6G ecosystem are quantum communications and reconfigurable intelligent surfaces (RIS). In this regard, this Newsletter will delve on these two key technologies envisioned for 6G wireless networks. In the quantum communications area, we have interviewed Prof. Robert Malanev, from The University of New South Wales, Australia, Dr. Angela Sara Cacciapouti, from University of Naples Federico II, Italy, and Prof. Mohsen Razavi, from University of Leeds, UK. We have also had the pleasure to get a position paper from Profs. Soon Xin Ng and Lajos Hanzo. Within the context of RIS, we have interviewed Prof. David Smith and Dr. Mohammadreza F. Imani, from Duke University, USA, Prof. Chau Yuen and Dr. Chongwen Huang, from Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore, and Prof. H. Vincent Poor, from Princeton University, USA, who provided us with their outlook on the opportunities and challenges on RIS. Furthermore, we are delighted to have two position papers on RIS, one written by Prof. George C. Alexandropoulos in conjunction with several collaborators, and another written by Prof. Ian F. Akyildiz, from Georgia Institute of Technology, USA.

I would like to thank our two feature topic editors: Dr. Daryus Chandra, from University of Naples Federico II, Italy, and Prof. George C. Alexandropoulos, from National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, for their hard efforts in arranging the content of this Newsletter. Moreover, we want to thank all authors and interviewees for sharing with us their experience and time. I would finally like to acknowledge the gracious support from the TCCN Chair, Dr. Yue Gao and all TCCN officers. If you have any suggestion, feel free to contact me at: danielbcosta@ieee.org. We hope that you enjoy the material of this Newsletter!

Daniel Benevides da Costa
Director, IEEE ComSoc TCCN Newsletter
Federal University of Ceará, Brazil

December 2019 edition of the TCCN Newsletter launched

(Download the newsletter here)

While 5G has been deployed around the world, there exist already numerous efforts and initiatives from industry and academia to look beyond 5G and conceptualize 6G by describing its roadmap along with the emerging trends and requirements, as well as several enabling techniques and architectures. The drivers of 6G will be a confluence of past trends (i.e., densification, higher rates, and massive antennas) and of new trends that include new services and applications, such as smart wearables, implants, extended reality devices, etc. Moreover, it is expected that 6G will be able to meet strict requirements for multiterabyte per second (Tb/s) and intelligent networks.

Two promising technologies for enabling the 6G ecosystem are terahertz (THz) communications and artificial intelligence (AI). In this regard, this Newsletter will delve on these two key technologies envisioned for 6G wireless networks. In the AI area, we have interviewed Prof. Tim O’Shea, from Virginia Tech, USA, Dr. Jakon Hoydis, from Nokia Bell Labs, France, Prof. Mérouane Debbah, from Huawei, France, and Prof. Deniz Gündüz, from Imperial College London, UK, who are leading experts in this area. We have also had the pleasure to get a position paper from Prof. Deniz Gündüz. Within the context of THz communications, we have interviewed Prof. Daniel Mittleman, from Brown University, Rhode Island, Prof. Josep M. Jornet, from Northeastern University, Boston, and Dr. Onur Sahin, from InterDigital Inc., London, who provided us with their outlook on the opportunities and challenges on AI. Finally, Prof. Cyril C. Renaud, from University College London, UK, provided a position paper that discusses the advancements in demonstration of wireless bridges at THz carrier frequencies over a fiber network as an argument to the advantages of using photonic solutions compared to electronics ones. It is also discussed the potential for photonic integration to create a viable THz photonics wireless technology.

I would like to thank our two feature topic editors: Prof. F. Rafael Marques Lima, from Federal University of Ceará, Brazil, and Dr. Hadi Sarieddeen, from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Saudi Arabia, for their efforts in arranging the content of this Newsletter. Moreover, we want to thank all authors and interviewees for sharing with us their experience and time. I would finally like to acknowledge the gracious support from the TCCN Chair, Dr. Yue Gao and all TCCN officers. If you have any suggestion, feel free to contact me at:
danielbcosta@ieee.org. We hope that you enjoy the material of this Newsletter!

Daniel Benevides da Costa
Director, IEEE ComSoc TCCN Newsletter
Federal University of Ceará, Brazil

May 2019 edition of the TCCN Newsletter launched

(Download the newsletter here)

Since December 2015, this Newsletter has presented and discussed some emerging topics related to the TCCN areas of interest. More specifically, it has covered a broad range of applications and techniques, for instance, non-orthogonal multiple access, ultra-reliable low-latency communications (URLLC), millimeter wave communications, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) communications, and massive machine-type communications (mMTC). We have interviewed over a dozen experts in these fields, included several interesting position papers, and provided state-of-the-art reviews. My sincere thanks to all the previous directors for their
contributions and help which have made this Newsletter a great success.

From my side, I have contributed in two previous TCCN Newsletter editions as Feature Editor, and this TCCN Newsletter issue is the first one that I am acting as Director. It has been a great pleasure and honor for me, and I am excited to cover two areas that will likely have impact in 5G and beyond: a) Blockchain and b) Internet of Things (IoT). In the Blockchain area, we have interviewed Prof. Dusit Niyato, from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, and Dr. Bhaskar Krichnamachari, from USC, who are leading experts in this area. We have also had the pleasure to get a position paper from Dr. BhaskarKrichnamachari. Within the context of IoT, we have interviewed Prof. Luiz A. da Silva, from Trinity College Dublin, Dr. Samir Perlaza, from INRIA, France, and Prof. Sergey Andreev, fromTampere University, Finland, who provided uswith their outlook on the opportunities and challenges of IoT. Finally, Prof. Giancarlo Fortino and Dr. Claudio Savaglio, from Università della Calabria, Italy, provided a position paper that presents ACOSO-Meth (Agent-based Cooperating Smart Objects Methodology), the first agent-based methodology that specifically and seamlessly supports the main phases of engineering of IoT ecosystems and related services.

Finally, I would like to thank our two feature topic editors: Prof. Walid Saad, from Virginia Tech – USA, and Prof. Pedro H. J. Nardelli, from Lappeenranta University of Technology – Finland, for their efforts in arranging the content of this Newsletter. Moreover, we want to thank all authors and interviewees for sharing with us their experience and time. I would finally like to acknowledge the gracious support from the TCCN chair, Dr. Yue Gao and all TCCN officers. If you have any suggestion, feel free to contact me at: danielbcosta@ieee.org. We hope that you enjoy the material of this Newsletter!

Daniel Benevides da Costa
Director, IEEE ComSoc TCCN Newsletter
Federal University of Ceará, Brazil

Dec 2018 edition of the TCCN Newsletter launched

(Download the newsletter here)

Over the past couple of years, we have strived to reshape this newsletter to expose some of the more emerging topics related to the TCCN areas of interest. In this regard, we have covered a broad range of applications and techniques, ranging from ultra-reliable low latency communications (URLLC) to the Internet of Things. We have interviewed over a dozen experts in these fields, and included several interesting position papers and reviews of the state-of-the-art.

In this final TCCN Newsletter for which I will be the director, I am excited to cover two areas that will likely have impact in 5G and beyond: a) Communications with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and b) massive machine type communications (mMTC). In the UAVs area, we have reviewed two key papers from recent works. We have also had the pleasure to interview Dr. Christian Bettstetter from the University of Klagenfurt, Austria, is a leading expert in this area.

Moreover, Dr. Halim Yanikomeroglu from Carelton University, who initiated much of the research on UAV communications, has also provided us with an exciting position paper in this domain. Within the context of mMTC, we have interviewed Dr. Giuseppe Durisi from Chalmers University, Sweden, Dr. Zaher Dawy from the American University of Beirut, Lebanon, and Dr. Toktam Mahmoodi from King’s College, UK, who provided us with their outlook on the opportunities and challenges of mMTC. Finally, Dr. Ekram Hossain from the University of Manitoba, Canada, provided a position paper that outlines the role of NOMA in machine type communications.

Finally, I would like to thank our two feature topic editors: Dr. Daniel Benevides da Costa from UFC – Brazil and Dr. Omid Semiari from Georgia Southern University, USA, for their efforts in arranging the content of this Newsletter. Moreover, we want to thank all interviewees for sharing with us their experience and time. I would finally like to acknowledge the gracious support from the TCCN chair, Dr. Jianwei Huang and all TCCN officers over the past two years. I look forward to seeing future TCCN newsletters with more exciting research insights and discussions.

Dr. Walid Saad
Vice Chair, IEEE ComSoc TCCN
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Virginia Tech, USA
http://resume.walid-saad.com

May 2018 edition of the TCCN Newsletter launched

(Download the newsletter here)

For decades, the wireless network evolution has been driven by a strive for higher data rates. Indeed, the whole premise of 4G networks had been on delivering higher rate and high network capacity. However, the advent of the Internet of Things and associated services, such as autonomous vehicles and virtual reality, has radically changed the wireless landscape. In particular, we are witnessing a major shift from data rate-centric wireless networks, to networks that require very low latency and high reliability. In this new latency-centric landscape, cognitive networking approaches will inevitably play a key role. In this regard, this TCCN Newsletter will delve into two key emerging technologies that pertain to the paradigm of highly reliable, low latency communications: a) ultra reliable low latency communication (URLLC) and b) mobile edge computing (MEC). Both URLLC and MEC will be critical components of emerging 5G networks and major contributors for the shift from rate-centric systems to latency-centric systems. Consequently, exposing their challenges and opportunities is essential. In order to do so, this first issue of the TCCN Newsletter of 2018 will bring together two feature topics on URLLC and MEC. Within each feature topic, we review the state of the art and provide an in-depth exposition of some of the recent research contributions. For URLLC, we also provide two expert interviews with Drs. Mehdi Bennis and Marios Kountouris, that provide the academic and industrial perspectives on URLLC. In the context of MEC, beyond also reviewing key papers, we provide two expert interviews with Drs. Kaibin Huang and Yang Yang.

That said, we would like to thank our two feature topic editors: Dr. Daniel Benevides da Costa from UFC – Brazil and Dr. Jie Xu, from Guangdong University of Technology, for their efforts in arranging the paper reviews and expert opinion. Moreover, we want to thank all interviewees for sharing with us their useful experience and future outlook on the discussed areas. I would finally like to acknowledge the gracious support from the TCCN chair, Dr. Jianwei Huang and all TCCN officers. As always, if you have any suggestions, feel free to contact me at: walids@vt.edu. We hope that you enjoy the material provided here!

Dr. Walid Saad
Vice Chair, IEEE ComSoc TCCN
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Virginia Tech, USA
http://resume.walid-saad.com

November 2017 edition of the TCCN Newsletter launched

(Download the newsletter here)

Dynamic spectrum access and spectrum sharing lie at the heart of cognitive radio networks. As such, developing new multiple access techniques along with exploiting unconventional frequency bands are necessary steps needed to ensure the wide-scale deployment of cognitive radio networks. In this regard, this TCCN Newsletter will delve into two key emerging technologies in this regard: a) non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) and b) Millimeter wave communications (mmWave). Both NOMA and mmWave are considered as major components of emerging 5G networks and, as such, exposing their challenges and opportunities is essential. In order to do so, this second issue of the TCCN Newsletter of 2017 will bring together two feature topics on NOMA and mmWave. Within each feature topic, we review the state of the art and provide an in-depth exposition of some of the recent research contributions. For NOMA, we also provide a position paper from Dr. Zhiguo Ding’s group who has been the driving force behind many of the key contributions in NOMA. In addition to these two feature topics, we discuss the theme of “Spectrum Scarcity”, which has been driving much of the research in wireless networks, in general, and cognitive radio networking, in particular, over the past few years. Within the context of this theme, we get expert opinions from Drs. Akbar Sayeed and Mérouane Debbah along with two position papers from the groups of Dr. Danijela Cabric and Dr. George K. Karagiannidis, that expose various research challenges within this theme.

That said, we would like to thank our two feature topic editors: Dr. Daniel Benevides da Costa from UFC – Brazil and Dr. Omid Semiari, from Georgia Southern University, for their efforts in arranging the paper reviews, positions papers, and expert opinion. Moreover, we want to thank all authors and interviewees for contributing their significant research works to the two feature topics and sharing with us their useful experience and future outlook on the area. I would finally like to acknowledge the gracious support from the TCCN chair, Dr. Jianwei Huang and all TCCN officers.  As always, if you have any suggestions, feel free to contact me at: walids@vt.edu. We hope that you enjoy the material provided here!

Dr. Walid Saad
Vice Chair, IEEE ComSoc TCCN
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Virginia Tech, USA
http://resume.walid-saad.com

Third Edition of the TCCN Newsletter launched

Cognitive radio networks are at the cusp of a major revolution. What started as a paradigm for spectrum sharing and dynamic spectrum access, grew into a major wireless communications field that weaves together multiple disciplines ranging from communication theory to machine learning, network science, and network science. As such, the concept of a cognitive network is rapidly evolving from a traditional, spectrum-centric perspective to a broader, network-wide perspective, in which cognition should no longer be restricted to spectrum access but must instead span the entire panoply of network functions.

This need for large-scale, intelligent cognition in wireless networks coupled with the ongoing 5G revolution, is also ushering in numerous innovative applications for cognitive radio networks that range from smart transportation to broad Internet of Things (IoT) ecosystems. In order to accompany this major change in cognitive networking paradigm, this first issue of the TCCN Newsletter of 2017 will primarily focus on new analytics and wireless applications which are expected to be central to tomorrow’s cognitive radio networks. In particular, this newsletter will feature two key cognitive radio networking topic: a) The Internet of Things and b) Machine Learning. For each topic, we have gathered a review on innovative new results that have appeared in the recent literature. Then, we had some stimulating discussions with leaders in the fields, in order to provide an in-depth discussion on the major technical challenges and opportunities in these two central areas of cognitive radio networking.

That said, we would like to thank our two feature topic editors: Dr. Nguyen Tran from Kyung Hee University and Dr. Muhammad Zeeshan Shakir from the University of West Scotland, for their efforts in arranging the paper reviews and expert interviews. Moreover, we want to thank all interviewees for contributing their significant research works to the two feature topics and sharing with us their useful experience and future outlook on the area. I would finally like to acknowledge the gracious support from the TCCN chair, Dr. Jianwei Huang and all TCCN officers. As always, if you have any suggestions, feel free to contact me. We hope that you enjoy the material provided here!

Dr. Walid Saad
Vice Chair, IEEE ComSoc TCCN
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Virginia Tech, USA
http://resume.walid-saad.com

Secure Cognitive Radio Networks with Multi-Phase Smart Relaying and Cooperative Jamming

Originally posted in Sec-IG blog (link to the original post)

Pin-Hsun Lin and Eduard A. Jorswieck

Dresden University of Technology, Germany

Due to the broadcast nature of wireless networks, communications are potentially subject to attacks, such as passive eavesdropping or active jamming. Instead of using the traditional cryptographic approaches [2] to combat the malicious users, we consider the information-theoretic secrecy. Note that the information-theoretic secrecy approach, initiated by Shannon [3] and developed by Wyner [4], can exploit the randomness of the wireless channels to ensure the secrecy of the transmitted messages while there is no assumption on the computation capabilities at the malicious users. As a performance measure for communication systems with secrecy constraints, a secrecy rate is defined as a rate at which the message can be transmitted reliably and securely between the legitimate nodes. However, similar to communication networks without secrecy constraints, the overall performance is limited by the relative channel qualities to guarantee secure communications. Many signal processing and multi-user techniques have therefore been proposed to overcome this limitation such as the use of multiple antennas.

Recently, there has been a substantial interest in the secrecy of multi-user systems [5], with a particular emphasis on potential cooperation between users to enhance the secrecy of communications. Cooperation in communication networks is an emerging technique to improve the reliability of wireless communication systems, and it involves multiple parties assisting each other in the transmission of messages, see e.g., [6]. Assuming that the cooperative node(s) can be trusted and that they aim at increasing the secrecy of the original transmission in the presence of a possible external eavesdropper, several cooperative strategies have been proposed. As one kind of cooperative communications schemes, cognitive radio technology has been proposed by Mitola in [7] as an efficient way to enhance the spectrum efficiency which has considerable development over the last few decades. The concept of cooperation for secrecy, and the corresponding cooperative techniques can naturally be applied to the cognitive radio network.

In this article, we consider a cognitive radio (CR) network including four single-antenna half-duplex nodes, where the CR receiver is treated as a potential eavesdropper with respect to the primary transmission [1]. In exchange for cooperation from the CR user to improve/maintain his own secrecy rate, the primary user allows the CR user to share part of the spectrum. Compared to some important literature in this research line, e.g., [8], [9], and [10], etc., we additionally consider the following secure coexistence conditions:

(i) the transmission of CR transmitter does not degrade the primary user’s secrecy rate, and
(ii) the encoder and decoder at the primary transmitter and receiver, respectively, are left intact whether CR transmits or not.

The reasons to consider the secure coexistence conditions are twofold. First, to utilize the time-frequency slot in the overlay sense, cognitive radio systems are obligated not to interfere the primary systems, which is common in cognitive radio systems design. Second, with the condition (ii), cognitive radios are backward compatible with the legacy systems, which cannot sense and adapt to the environment agilely. This conditions make the cognitive radio capable of operating in broader usage scenarios. One of the possible practical scenarios of the considered model is that, the primary users belong to a licensed system, who sells rights of the spectrum usage to a femtocell system. Here we can let the CR transmitter and receiver be the femtocell base station and users, respectively. However, the femtocell operator may not be able to guarantee that the femtocell users are malicious or not. Thus, to provide a secrecy transmission to the primary users, not only the primary base station needs to use the wiretap coding, but also the femtocell base station needs to help to maintain the secrecy transmission for the primary system.

We analyze the achievable secrecy rate with weak secrecy of the cognitive user in the cognitive radio network under the secure coexistence conditions. In addition, we derive the rate constraints to guarantee that the primary user’s weak secrecy is unchanged as well, which requires different analysis compared to [8], [9], [10]. For example, the relation between channels observed by the primary transmitter before and after the cognitive transmitter is active should investigated for proper relay and jamming design. Otherwise, either the reliability of the cognitive user or the secrecy of the primary user will be violated. In Fig. 1 we show two improper system designs, where the black rectangular denotes the wiretap code used by the primary user, i.e., the row and column of it are indexed by the secure and confusion messages, respectively and each entry is a codeword. The height and width of the blue rectangular denote the capacity of the channels between the primary transmitter to the primary receiver and that between the primary transmitter to the CR receiver, respectively, after CR transmitter starts to transmit. Fig. 1 (a) shows that, both reliability and secrecy are fulfilled. However, the cognitive transmitter may overdesign the relay power for the primary user’s signal such that the capacity is too large, which is inefficient for the CR user. In particular, that means CR transmitter wastes power on constructing a too good channel for the primary user., while the remained power for CR’s own transmission is reduced. In contrast, Fig. 1 (b) shows that, the relay is efficient, i.e., the new channel is efficient for the transmission of the secure message. However, the confusion rate is not high enough for the new channel, which causes that the secrecy is violated. Therefore, the analysis of the aforementioned rate constraints is important. In addition, we also derive a capacity upper bound for the CR user under both discrete memoryless and additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channels to evaluate the performance of the achievable scheme.

Fig. 1. Improper design of the relay and jamming.

We then propose a multi-phase transmission scheme, which considers the following additional phases. First, to accommodate the operations of practical systems, we take into account the first additional phase for listening to/decoding the primary’s signal at the CR transmitter. Note that the primary user’s signal is commonly assumed non-causally known at CR transmitter. Second, we introduce another additional phase as the third one to endow the cognitive system an extra degree of freedom for utilizing different transmission schemes. For AWGN channels, this degree of freedom improves the performance by exploiting pure relaying and jamming but not simultaneously transmitting cognitive user’s own signal.

Finally, we illustrate our results through one numerical example as shown in Fig. 2 based on a geometrical setup, which highlights the impact of the node geometry on the achievable rates and on the optimal power allocation and time splitting of the CR transmitter. Note that we fix the locations of the primary transmitter and receiver at the coordinates (0,0) and (1,0), respectively. The CR receiver is fixed at (1,-1). We assume a path-loss model with path-loss exponent. The power constraints at the primary and CR transmitters are 10 dB and 20 dB, respectively. Note that we also include the power control as a possible design parameter for the CR transmitter, i.e., the transmission power utilized is not necessarily fixed to its maximum. The unit of rate results is bit per channel use. Further numerical results in [1] show that 1) the proposed 3-phase clean relaying scheme indeed improves the cognitive user’s rate; 2) the proposed achievable scheme is close to capacity when the CR transmitter/receiver is far/close enough to the primary receiver/transmitter, respectively.

Fig. 2. Maximum achievable CR user’s rates as a function of the position of the CR transmitter.

 

References

[1] P. -H LIn, F. Gabry, R. Thobaben, E. A. Jorswieck and M. Skoglund, “Multi-Phase Smart Relaying and Cooperative Jamming in Secure Cognitive Radio Networks”, IEEE Transactions on Cognitive Communications and Networking, Vol. 2, No 1 pp. 38-52, Mar. 2016

[2] A. J. Menezes, P. C. van Oorschot, and S. A. Vanstone, Handbook of Applied Cryptography. Boca Raton, FL, USA: CRC Press, 1996.

[3] C. E. Shannon, “Communication theory of secrecy systems”, Bell Syst. Tech. J., vol. 28, no 4, pp. 656-715, Oct. 1949.

[4] A. D. Wyner, “The wire-tap channel”, Bell Syst. Tech. J., vol. 54, no 8, pp. 1355-1387, Oct. 1975.

[5] Y. Liang, A. Somekh-Baruch, H. V. Poor, S. S. Shamai, and S. Verdú, “Capacity of cognitive interference channels with and without secrecy,” IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory, vol. 55, no. 2, pp. 604–619, Feb. 2009.

[6] H. G. Bafghi, S. Salimi, B. Seyfe, and M. R. Aref, “Cognitive interference channel with two confidential messages,” in Proc. IEEE Int. Symp. Inf. Theory Appl. (ISITA), Taichung, Taiwan, 2010, pp. 952–956.

[7] R. K. Farsani and R. Ebrahimpour, “Capacity theorems for the cognitive radio channel with confidential messages,” in Proc. IEEE Int. Symp. Inf. Theory (ISIT), Honolulu, HI, USA, 2014, pp. 1416–1420.

CFP: Cognitive Radio and Networks Symposium at IEEE GLOBECOM 2017

Scope and Motivation: Emerging cognitive radio communications and networking technologies potentially provide a promising solution to the spectrum underutilization problem in wireless access, improving the interoperability and coexistence among different wireless/mobile communications systems and making the future-generation radio devices/systems autonomous and selfreconfigurable. The goal of this symposium is to bring together and disseminate state of the art research contributions that address various aspects of analysis, design, optimization, implementation, standardization, and application of cognitive radio communications and networking technologies. The scope of this symposium includes (but is not limited to) the topics below.

Main Topics of Interest: The Cognitive Radio and Networks Symposium seeks original contributions in, but not limited to, the following topical areas:

● Challenges and issues in designing cognitive radios and cognitive radio networks

● Architectures and building blocks of cognitive radio networks

● Spectrum sensing, measurements and statistical modeling of spectrum usage

● Waveform design, modulation, and interference aggregation for cognitive radio

● Distributed cooperative spectrum sensing and multi-user access

● Cognitive medium access control, interference management and modeling

● Dynamic spectrum sharing

● Handoff and routing protocols

● Resource allocation for multi-antenna based cognitive radio communications

● Energy-efficient cognitive radio communications and networking

● Self-configuration, interoperability and co-existence issues

● Distributed adaptation and optimization methods

● Machine learning techniques for cognitive radio systems

● Architecture and implementation of database-based cognitive radio networks

● Cooperative and coordinated communications

● Economic aspects of spectrum sharing in cognitive radio networks

● Regulatory policies and their interactions with communications and networking

● Privacy and security of cognitive spectrum-agile networks

● Attack modeling, prevention, mitigation, and defense in cognitive radio systems

● Physical-layer secrecy in cognitive networks

● Modeling and performance evaluation

● Quality of service provisioning in cognitive radio networks

● Spectrum sensing and sharing for Internet of Things

● Spectrum sensing and sharing for mm-wave

● Applications and services (e.g., cognitive networking in TV whitespace, adaptation with LTE networks such as LTE-unlicensed, and integration with other merging techniques such as massive MIMO and full-duplex)

● Cognitive radio standards, test-beds, simulation tools, and hardware prototypes. The authors of selected papers from this symposium will be invited to submit an extended version of their work for fast-track review in the IEEE Transactions on Cognitive Communications and Networking.

How to Submit a Paper:

The submission is through EDAS. Please check IEEE Globecom 2017 website for full instructions. This CFP can also be found at: http://globecom2017.ieee-globecom.org/content/call-symposium-papers

Symposium Co-Chairs:

● Jianwei Huang (The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

● K.P. Subbalakshmi (Stevens Institute of Technology)

● Yue Gao (Queen Mary University of London)

Biographies:

Jianwei Huang is an Associate Professor and Director of the Network Communications and Economics Lab (ncel.ie.cuhk.edu.hk), in the Department of Information Engineering at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He received the Ph.D. degree from Northwestern University in 2005, and worked as a Postdoc Research Associate at Princeton University during 2005-2007. He is the co-recipient of 8 international Best Paper Awards, including IEEE Marconi Prize Paper Award in Wireless Communications in 2011. He has co-authored five books: “Wireless Network Pricing,” “Monotonic Optimization in Communication and Networking Systems,” “Cognitive Mobile Virtual Network Operator Games,” “Social Cognitive Radio Networks”, and “Economics of Database-Assisted Spectrum Sharing”. He has served as a Founding Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Cognitive Communications and Networking, an Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, and a Founding Associate Editor of IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications – Cognitive Radio Series. He is the Vice Chair of IEEE ComSoc Cognitive Network Technical Committee and the Past Chair of IEEE ComSoc Multimedia Communications Technical Committee. He has served as a Distinguished Lecturer of IEEE Communications Society since 2015. At the age of 37, he was elevated to IEEE Fellow for his contributions to resource allocation in wireless cellular and cognitive radio systems, and his seminal work on the economics based analysis and design of modern wireless communication systems.

K.P. Subbalakshmi is a Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology. Her research interests are in Cognitive Radio Networking, Cognitive Cloud Computing, Dynamic Spectrum Access security, Social Media Analysis and Forensics and their applications to smart cities and connected communities. She was named a Jefferson Science Fellow in 2016. As a JSF she worked at the US Department of State, on technology and policy issues in 5G networks, IoT and Smart and Connected Communities during the Academic Year 2016-2017. She is also a Co-Founder of two technology start-ups that commercialize her work on cognitive radio networks and text analytics. She served as a Subject Matter Expert for the National Spectrum Consortium in 2015. She is a Founding Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Cognitive Communications and Networking. She is the Founding Chair of the Special Interest Group on Security, IEEE COMSOC’s Technical Committee on Cognitive Networks. She is a recipient of the New Jersey Inventors Hall of Fame, Innovator Award.

Yue Gao is a Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) and Director of Whitespace Machine Communication Lab (wmc.eecs.qmul.ac.uk) in the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science at Queen Mary University of London in United Kingdom. He worked as Research Assistant and Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science at QMUL. He received his Bachelor degree from Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications in China in 2002, and his MSc and PhD degrees in telecommunications and microwave antennas from QMUL in 2003 and 2007, respectively. He has authored and coauthored over 100 peer-reviewed journal and conference papers, 2 best paper awards, 2 patents and 2 licensed works to companies, and one book chapter. He is a Senior Member of the IEEE and has served as the Signal Processing for Communications Symposium Co-Chair for IEEE ICCC 2016, and is serving Publicity Co- Chair for GLOBECOM 2016, and the General Co-Chair of the IEEE WoWMoM 2017.

Posted in CFP